HEALTH

As of April 2018, there are 27 public health centers, 3 Lying-in Clinics, 1 Social Hygiene Clinic with drop-in center and treatment hub serving the city, 1 Dialysis Center, and 1 Adolescent Hub. 20 barangays have their own health centers, with Addition Hills having 4 health centers to serve more number of residents especially in the Welfareville Area. Barangays Barangka  Ibaba  and

Barangka Itaas, Old Zaniga and New Zaniga, and Bagong Silang and Daang Bakal each share a health center while Barangay Wack-Wack, with high income class residents, is capable enough to avail of private health services. (see Maps 2.01 and 2.02)

Each health center is manned with public health personnel such as doctors, midwives, nurses and dentists.  A total of 31 doctors, 45 nurses, 54 dentists, 57 midwives, 105 BHWs (Barangay Health Workers) and 41 BNSs (Barangay Nutrition Scholars) serve the whole populace.  With a population of 423,571 (2018), the ratios of public health personnel to the population except for midwives to population ratio are lower than those of the national standards as enumerated below:

Doctor/pop’n.     –       1 : 13,664   <  1:20,000

Nurses/pop’n.    –       1 : 9,413     <  1:15,000

Dentists/Pop’n.   –      1 : 7,844     < 1:20,000

Midwives/pop’n –      1 : 7,431     < 1: 5,000

The following data summarizes the health status of the local population.

Table 2.07 Total Population by Religious Affiliation and Sex (Source: PSA, 2015 Census)

Religious Affiliation

Both Sexes

Male

Female

Roman Catholic

348,450

171,868

176,582

Aglipayan

931

414

517

Islam 

2,842

1,331

1,511

Iglesia ni Krsito

9,660

4,660

5,000

Other Protestant

1,100

529

571

Buddhist

305

156

149

Jehovah’s Witness

1,853

847

1,006

Tribal Religions

5

1

4

Others

20,437

9,579

10,858

None

66

32

34

Unknown

627

340

287

TOTAL

386,276

189,757

196,519

Maternal and Child Care

a. % of Women provided with Pre-Natal Care

Of the 10,463 estimated number of pregnant women in 2017, only 65.73% or 6,877 have availed or 6,877 have availed of public pre-natal care at least once every three months. In 2015 and 2016, 90.01% or 8,642 of pregnant women and 89.97 or 8,515 of targeted pregnant women, respectively, have availed of the program.

b. Maternal Mortality Rate

In 2017, Maternal Mortality Rate is recorded at 2 deaths from maternal causes out of 5,981 registered live births. In 2016 and 2015, the rate is

3 and 6 deaths to a total live birth of 6,321 and 5,298, respectively. In these years, no women died during pregnancy although cases of High-Risk Pregnancy were at 8.71% (521) in 2017 without any cases of Terminated Pregnancy recorded.

c. Post-Partum Care

For women who have given birth in 2015, 2016 and 2017, records show that 89.97%, 90.01%, and 65.73% respectively have availed of Post-Partum Care of at least 3 home visits and 1 clinic visit.

d. Proportion of Deliveries attended by Skilled personnel

More or less 98% of deliveries in 2015, 2016 and 2017 were attended by skilled personnel, which can be assumed were done in health facilities.

e. Births to Women of Specific Age Group

The total number of births to women of specific age group as recorded from 2015 to 2017 are shown in Table 2.08.

Table 2.08. No. of Births to Women of Specific Age Group : 2015 – 2017 (Source: Civil Registry Department)

Age Group

No. of Birth

2015

2016

2017

10-14

8

14

1

15-19

566

710

682

20-24

1,505

1,702

1,541

25-29

1,407

1,740

1,650

30-34

1,082

1,219

1,126

35-39

584

701

726

40-44

138

232

245

45-49

8

3

10

TOTAL

5,298

6,321

5,981

f. % of Fully –immunized Children

Almost 93% or 8,801 out of the targeted 9,465 children 0-11 months old have been fully immunized in 2015 while 90.95% of 9,602 children in 2016 and 90% of 10,463 children in 2017 were immunized.

g. Status of Malnutrition

Of the children 0-59 months old, the year 2015 recorded 431 children or 0.77% to be below normal weight for their age. In 2016, only 339 children or 0.61% of the target children were below normal weight and the decreasing trend continues in 2017 with only 0.49% or 281 children found to be below normal weight. Severely and moderately underweight children 36 – 59 months old were recorded at 0.41% (228), 0.27% (151), and 0.24 (138) of the total children targeted in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. All in all, of the total number of targeted children in 2015, 2016 and 2017, 0.71% (476), 0.70% (390) and 0.54% (308), respectively, were recorded as either underweight or severely underweight. Percentage of low birth weight for 2015, 2016 and 2017 were recorded at 4.02 (245), 3.8% (222) and 3.22% (163) respectively.

h. Infant/Child Mortality Rate (under 5 years old)

In 2015, the number of deaths among children below 5 years old is recorded at 29 deaths or a mortality rate of 0.55%. This gives 4.76 per 1000 population. The rate increased in 2016 and 2017 wherein 42 and 38 deaths were recorded with an equivalent rate of 7.19 and 7.28 per 1,000 live births with mortality rates of 0.66% and 0.64% respectively.

Morbidity Rate

As shown in Table 2.11, five of the top ten leading causes of illnesses pertain to respiratory illnesses, from respiratory tract infection to pneumonia. Other causes of illnesses pertain to skin diseases, urinary tract infection, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and others. In 2015, 2016 and 2017, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection had the highest number of cases per 100,000 population reported, while Hypertension, Diabetes and UTI persist.

Table 2.11.     Morbidity Count and Ten Most Common Causes of Illness: 2016 - 2017

Cause of Illness

Morbidity Count

2016

2017

Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI)

14,210

9,344

Hypertension

4,020

7,475

Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

4,826

4,330

Bronchitis/Broncholitis

1,191

1,996

Dermatitis (Skin Diseases)

2,493

1,801

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

885

1,597

Pneumonia

N/A

1,479

Acute Tonsilo-Pharyngitis (ATP)

N/A

1,417

Diabetes Mellitus

1,000

1,395

Systemic Viral Infection (SVI/AVI)

N/A

859

Source: City Health Department

Crude Death Rate

For the years 2015 up to 2017, the Crude Death Rate is recorded at 4.22. This means that more than 4 people per 1000 population died in 2017. As shown in Table 2.10, the highest death toll is in the age group of 40-54 years old. Higher death toll is observed in the age groups of 40-44 years and up.



Hospital Services

Public Health Services are augmented by the city-owned and operated Mandaluyong City Medical Center located along Boni Avenue near the City Hall Complex and which provides Secondary Level Health Services. As of 2014, MCMC has a 150 bed capacity with 78% occupancy rate per day. To accommodate more people needing maternal and child care, the Mandaluyong City Children’s and Maternity Hospital was established in Welfareville Compound along Martinez Street, Barangay Addition Hills. This April 2018 marked the inauguration and opening of the new Dialysis Center and Adolescent Hub also situated in Martinez St., Brgy. Addition Hills. To date, a new MCMC building is under construction at the back of the Children’s and Maternity Hospital with a total bed capacity of 300.

For mental health, the city is host to the National Center for Mental Health which caters to patients from all over the country. Two private hospitals, Victor R. Potenciano Medical Center and Unciano General Hospital provide tertiary and secondary level services, respectively, with a combined bed capacity of 215. Other specialized services are provided by various private clinics, from medical, dental, health and wellness, skin clinics, optometric, to laboratory, custodial and rehabilitation services. These clinics are usually located along main roads and in commercial malls in the city. In 2017, 125 Clinics and 25 Diagnostic Centers can accommodate patients with 201 and 175 clinic beds and diagnostic center beds, respectively.



Persons with Disabilities

Special programs for this segment of the population are being carried out by the city government to encourage productivity not just in the economic aspect but also in sports and community development. In 1998, The City Council through City Ordinance No. 193, S-1998 created the Disabled Persons Affairs Division (DPAD) under the Office of the City Administrator to focus on programs and projects for persons with disabilities. DPAD has developed sustaining programs which had reached thousands of special children and differently-abled persons over the past years. Among these programs are research, education, advocacy, inclusivity, accessibility, community-based program and organization, sports and socio-cultural program, employment and livelihood, as well as income generation.

By the end of March 2018, a total of 5,193 PWDs have registered with DPAD with 2,404 female (46.29%) and 2,789 male (53.71%) residents which doubled compared to 2,311 PWDs registered with the division back in 2014. A quarter (24.67%) of the PWDs in the city reside in Brgy. Addition Hills. To facilitate availment of services and encourage PWD participation and inclusion in community and city government activities, PWD organizations were formed, such as:


1. Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) Philippines – Mandaluyong Chapter

2. Autism Society Philippines – Mandaluyong Chapter

3. Barangay Highway Hills PWD Organization

4. Barangay Hulo PWD Organization

5. Barangay Mauway PWD Organization

6. Barangay Poblacion PWD Organization

7. Cerebral Palsy Association of the Philippines – Mandaluyong Chapter

8. Deaf Empowerment Association of Mandaluyong

9. Down Syndrome Association of Mandaluyong

10. Katipunan ng mga Magulang ng Batang may Kapansanan, Inc.

11. Mandaluyong Association of Visually Impaired Person

12. Mandaluyong CWD Dancers Parent Organization

13. Mandaluyong CWD Drum & Lyre Parents Organization

14. Special Child Parents Organization

 Table 2.12.  Performance Indicators on Health: 2015-2017

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Year

2015

2016

2017

Status of Malnutrition (UW & SUW)

476 = 0.86%

390 = 0.70%

308 = 0.54%

Proportion of children 0-5 yrs. Old who are below normal weight for their age (0-59 mos.)

431 = 0.77%

339 = 0.61%

281 = 0.49

Prevalence of severely and moderately underweight preschoolers (36-59 mos.)

228 = 0.41%

151 = 0.27%

138 = 0.24%

% of Low Birth Weight

245 = 4.02%

222 = 3.8%

163 = 3.22%

Proportion of children under 5 years old who died of illness

70 = 11.49%

72 = 12.32%

49 = 9.39%

Fully immunized children

8,801 = 92.99%

8,736 = 90.95%

9,379 = 90%

Prevalence of Anemia and Iodine Deficiency: VAD, IDD, IDA

0

0

0

Women provided with pre-natal care

8,515 = 89.97%

8,642 = 90.01%

6,877 = 65.73%

Post-Partum Care (% at least 3 home visits, 1 clinic visit)

8,515 = 89.97%

8,642 = 90.01%

6,877 = 65.73%

Maternal Mortality Rate

6 = 1 / 883 livebirths

3 = 1 / 2,107 livebirths

2 = 1 / 2,991 livebirths

Infant/Child Mortality Rate (children under 5 years old)

29 = 4.76 / 1,000 livebirths

42 = 7.19 / 1,000 livebirths

38 = 7.28 / 1,000 livebirths

Proportion of Women who died due to pregnancy

6

3

2

Proportion of Births attended by skilled personnel

5,990 = 98.9%

5,771 = 98.75%

5,180 = 98%

Proportion of Deliveries in health facilities

 

 

 

Contraceptive Prevalence Rate in Modern Family Planning current adaptors

22,188 = 51.36%

23,006 = 52.49%

15,384 = 32.21%

% of High Risk Pregnancy 

0

0

521 = 8.71%

Terminated Pregnancy or Abortion

0

0

0

Couples who have access to Family Planning – Pre-marriage Counseling

0

0

15,384

Prevalence Rates of:

 

 

 

  • HIV/AIDS

0

0

0

  • Malaria

0

0

0

  • Tuberculosis

508

497

595

Total Number of Health Staff

 

 

 

  • Doctors

37

38

42

  • Dentists

32

32

32

  • Nurses

55

53

45

  • Midwives

58

52

56

  • BNSs

44

40

41

  • BHW

105

105

105

% of population covered by PhilHealth (LGU sponsored)

 

 

 

Source: City Health Department

Project TEACH

To address the needs of children with special needs, Mandaluyong City adapted the WHO’s mandate on providing a community-based rehabilitation program for the underprivileged persons with disabilities.  Project Therapy, Education and Assimilation of Children with Handicap (T.E.A.C.H.) was established in 2007 in partnership with a non-stock, non-profit organization, the R.E.A.C.H. Foundation, Inc. This project presents an innovative, cost-effective, integrated, holistic and community-based approach in providing therapy, education, medical and related services to Children with Disabilities (CWD). It is a multi-sector collaboration and fosters a strong partnership with civil society, NGOs, funding institutions and the academe.

Partly funded by the city government during its early years of operation, Project T.E.A.C.H. is now a part of the city’s Organizational Structure receiving full funding from the Office of the Mayor.   The programs of Project T.E.A.C.H. are institutionalized and strengthened by virtue of City Ordinance No. 405, s-2008 also known as the Mandaluyong City Children’s Code.

In 2008, Project T.E.A.C.H. was given the top award in the World Bank’s Panibagong Paraan: a completion of Innovative Program, and in 2009, the project was recognized as one of the Top 3 Most Innovative Health Care Program by the Department of Health.  It is also one of the two entries of the City that have received the GALING POOK Award in 2012 notably for its innovations, efficacy, replicability and community impact. In 2015, Project T.E.A.C.H. was awarded 2nd place in the United Nations Service Awards as one of the best and effective practices in the world.

 

EDUCATION

Public and private schools offering all levels of education from pre-school to post graduate studies are scattered in the city.  As of 2018, there are 19 public elementary schools and 12 public secondary schools serving formal education needs of local constituents. Public and private schools are currently implementing the K-12 curriculum since 2016.

 

Public Elementary and Secondary Schools

Of the 19 public elementary schools, 8 have expanded to integrate secondary schools in their facilities.  Of the 12 secondary schools other than those integrated with elementary, 3 are regular high schools, 1 is a science high school, and 1 is a National Special School and 11 of these already has Senior High School in their curriculum. The elementary level utilizes 770 academic classrooms bringing forth an average classroom-pupil ratio of 1 : 22 with shifting and 1 : 43 without shifting, while secondary schools have 398 classrooms for Junior High and 157 classrooms for Senior High for a total of 555 classrooms with an average classroom-student ratio of 1 : 49 for a single shift and 1 : 26 for Junior and Senior High, respectively.  All public-school teachers are nationally-paid.  Public Non-teaching personnel are a combination of nationally-paid and city-paid individuals.

Data on Public Schools facilities and personnel for SY 2018-2019 are shown in Table 2.13.  (see also Map 2.03 for Day-Care Services and Map 2.04 for Data on Public Schools) For SY 2017-2018, performance indicators are shown in Table 2.14 by level of education, public and private schools.

Tertiary Education

Private schools offer tertiary education in the city.  Most popular among these are the Don Bosco Technical College, Jose Rizal University, and the International Baptist College.

The Rizal Technological University which is a national state university also offers high school education.  At present, plans for a city college with 41 academic classrooms and 11 various laboratory classrooms is being prepared with target location inside the Welfareville Compound, Barangay Addition Hills. (See Map 2.05)

Alternative Learning System

All public schools in the city support the Alternative Learning System, formerly known as non-formal education.

Table 2.13 Data on Public Schools, City of Mandaluyong:     June 2018

Elementary School

Enrolment

No. of Teachers (Nationally Paid)

Pupil-Teacher Ratio

Teaching Related (National)

Non-Teaching Personnel

K-Grade 6, SPED

Nationally Paid

City Paid

Addition Hills Integrated School

2,610

75

34.8

1

 

14

Amado T. Reyes Elementary School

168

9

18.67

1

 

7

Andres Bonifacio Integrated School

2,240

74

30.27

 

 

24

Dona Basilisa Yangco Elementary School

464

16

29

1

 

14

Dona Pilar C. Gonzaga Elementary School

1,808

45

40.18

1

 

11

Eulogio Rodriguez Integrated School

2,544

74

34.38

1

 

30

Filemon P. Javier Elementary School

518

21

24.67

1

 

12

Highway Hills Integrated School

3,338

94

35.51

1

 

34

Hulo Integrated School

1,885

62

30.4

1

 

19

Ilaya Barangka Integrated School

1,555

45

34.56

1

 

26

Isaac Lopez Integrated School

1,721

54

31.87

1

 

24

Jose Fabella Memorial School

1,497

87

17.21

 

 

 

Mandaluyong Addition Hills Elementary School

1,507

42

35.88

1

 

20

Mandaluyong Elementary School

1,966

66

29.79

1

 

22

Nueve de Febrero Elementary School

3,083

98

31.46

1

 

17

Pedro P. Cruz Elementary School

2,674

83

32.22

1

 

21

Plainview Elementary School

1,314

44

29.86

1

 

18

Pleasant Hills Elementary School

2,224

59

37.69

1

 

14

Renato R. Lopez Elementary School

437

15

29.13

1

 

7

Total Elementary 

33,553

1,063

31.56

17

0

334

Junior High School

Enrolment

No. of Teachers (Nationally Paid)

Pupil-Teacher Ratio

Teaching Related (National)

Non-Teaching Personnel

Nationally Paid

City Paid

Addition Hills Integrated School

1,555

56

27.77

 

 

 

Andres Bonifacio Integrated School

1,885

85

22.18

7

2

 

Bonifacio Javier National High School

1,230

68

18.08

8

2

13

City of Mandaluyong Science High School

711

41

17.34

4

1

22

Eulogio Rodriguez Integrated School

1,939

82

23.65

5

2

 

Highway Hills Integrated School

2,185

81

26.98

7

2

 

Hulo Integrated School

513

22

23.32

 

 

 

Ilaya Barangka Integrated School

1,007

33

30.52

1

 

 

Isaac Lopez Integrated School

1,415

54

26.2

2

2

 

Jose Fabella Memorial School

1,006

65

15.48

3

43

 

Mandaluyong High School

2,769

127

21.8

6

8

21

Mataas na Paaralang Neptali A. Gonzales

3,244

135

24.03

8

2

29

Total Secondary (Junior)

19,459

849

23.11

51

64

85

Senior High School

Enrolment

No. of Teachers (Nationally Paid)

Pupil-Teacher Ratio

Teaching Related (National)

Non-Teaching Personnel

Nationally Paid

City Paid

Addition Hills Integrated School

330

17

19.41

 

2

 

Andres Bonifacio Integrated School

558

9

62

 

2

 

Bonifacio Javier National High School

86

3

28.67

 

1

 

City of Mandaluyong Science High School

294

14

21

 

1

 

Eulogio Rodriguez Integrated School

286

16

17.88

 

 

 

Highway Hills Integrated School

401

16

25.06

1

1

 

Ilaya Barangka Integrated School

208

8

26

 

1

 

Isaac Lopez Integrated School

269

13

20.69

 

 

 

Senior High School

Enrolment

No. of Teachers (Nationally Paid)

Pupil-Teacher Ratio

Teaching Related (National)

Non-Teaching Personnel

Nationally Paid

City Paid

Jose Fabella Memorial School

260

5

52

 

1

 

Mandaluyong High School

614

15

40.93

1

1

 

Mataas na Paaralang Neptali A. Gonzales

759

21

36.14

1

3

 

Total Secondary (Senior)

4065

137

29.67

5

11

0

Source: City Schools Division Office – Division of Mandaluyong

Classes offered are mainly on manpower skills development and livelihood skills development. DepEd - Mandaluyong Division also conducts outreach ALS with program partners. A total of 1,480 enrollees were recorded for S.Y. 2017 – 2018.

The Mandaluyong Manpower and Technical-Vocational Training Center (MMTVTC) provides soft and hard courses on livelihood activities with training periods ranging from three months to six months, as well as computer courses, English proficiency and others. In addition, it serves as job placement and counseling office for those seeking employment or guidance in choosing career options. Table 2.15 shows the accomplishment of the center for the academic year 2017-2018. As of 2015, MMTVTC has two training venues with a percentage of graduates placed at 87.16% based on the total number of enrollees. For the period January 9, 2017 – January 5, 2018, 1670 out of the 1694 examinees or an equivalent of 98.58% passed the Trade Test on various courses (Table 2.16).

The MMTVTC conducts Assessment for Competency Examination in various trade areas to out-going trainees in order to determine their effectiveness in skills by theories and practical applications and to upgrade their qualification for employment. The examination is administered by testing officers from the TESDA-NCR-PAMAMARISAN District.

Entrepreneurial initiatives are also a regular program of the center especially for the out-of- school youths and the unemployed adults. Seminars are conducted regularly by TESDA and other private agencies. These seminars aim to assist beneficiaries to get into employment through industry or self-employment.

Aside from trainings, MMTVTC undertakes outreach projects providing services performed by trainees and graduates of the center such as Beauty Care Outreach Program (free haircut & manicure), and Massage Therapy Outreach Program providing free massage services to clients. MMTVTC is multi-awarded training institution and is gearing towards being an Assessment Center for Tech-Voc competencies. The Rizal Technological University has a Department of Non-Formal Education and Extension Services that grants certificates in vocational courses similar to those offered by the center.

Table 2.14. Performance Indicators by Level of Education, Public and Private: SY 2018-2019

ENROLMENT

Public

Private

SUC (RTU)

Total

Kinder

4,477

11,729

0

6,206

Elementary

28463

8,575

0

37,038

Junior HS

19,362

6,270

655

26,287

Senior HS

4,072

9,768

1,260

15,100

SPED

450

158

0

608

 Total

56,824

26,500

1,915

85,239

Public Schools

Elementary

Secondary

ACCESS

Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) or Participation Rate

106.5

108.68

Net Enrolment Ratio (NER) or Participation Rate

99.97

92.26

Transition Rate Primary to Intermediate 

96.59

97.26

EFFICIENCY

Cohort Survival Rate 

89.11

84.18

Retention Rate

97.18

93.86

Repetition Rate 

2.06

4.23

Dropout Rate

0.35

0.44

Completion Rate

82.7

84.18

Graduation Rate

91.79

97.41

Promotion Rate

95.55

89.97

School Leaver Rate

2.42

3.98

Source:  Schools Division Office, City of Mandaluyong

HOUSING

There are a total of 100,356 Households residing in Mandaluyong living in 93,319 Occupied Housing Units. Due to the small space of Mandaluyong, Multi-unit residential houses are popular, in which a majority (50.64%) of the total households are living in one. Some opt to live in Single houses (36.60%), or in Duplex (12.33%). Almost 99% of the households have Electricity for lighting. More than half (56.18) of the households use tap water for drinking while a good 33.18% purchase bottled water from water stations.

Most of the households are living in houses constructed using concrete / brick / stone (62.28%), some in Half-concrete / brick / stone and half-wood (24.27%), others in housing made solely with Wood (12.28), while the ‘Other’ households occupy houses made with Galvanized Iron / Aluminum, Bamboo / Sawali / Cogon / Nipa, Trapal, Glass, Makeshift / salvaged / improvised Materials, Asbestos, and other materials (1.17%).

41.12% of the Households in Mandaluyong rent their houses and their lot while 40.31% owns or has owner-like possession of their house and lot. 8.78% of the households own their houses while being free of the rent for the lot that the house is on with the consent of the owner, while 3.19% does not have the consent of the owner. 5.33% of the households has the consent of the owner to live in the house and lot without rent, while 450 families (0.45%) do not have consent at all. All of the figures given above came from the 2015 Census of Population by the Philippine Statistics Authority.

Local Housing Task Force

With the aim to provide decent and affordable housing to its constituents, the city government of Mandaluyong created three organizations in lieu of a housing task force: (1) the Mandaluyong Housing Development Board (MHDB) now expanded as the Mandaluyong Housing Development Department as per latest City Ordinance on Reorganization, with mandated functions pursuant to UDHA, (2) the Welfareville Commission for the generation and maintenance of database and coordination of housing programs and relevant developments concerning informal settlers within the Welfareville compound, and (3) an ad-hoc committee that serves as advisory body to the Board, the Sanggunian or the LDC on matters of shelter concerns. On September 3, 2012, Executive Order No. 007, s-2012 was issued by the Office of the City Mayor “Creating the Committee for Securing Transfer Certificates of Titles and Condominium Certificate of Titles on Properties of the City Government” in particular the medium-rise buildings for socialized housing. This is to ensure that beneficiaries of the housing program who have fully paid the amortization and completed the requirements were issued corresponding TCTs or CCTs. Process improvements were also institutionalized through the virtue of City Council Resolution No. 2360, S-2016, wherein awardees can pay amortizations directly to the Land Bank of the Philippines. Also, numerous resolutions were also passed in support of financial assistance to relocations due to proposed government projects and various calamities like fire.

Status of Informal Settlements

The main problem on housing is the presence of Informal Settlers in the city. As reported by the Mandaluyong Housing and Development Department, a total of 24,801 households are informal settlers, approximately 89 % of which are located in Welfareville Compound, Barangay Addition Hills. (See Map 2.06)

The City Government of Mandaluyong is constrained to act fully on the problem of Informal Settlers in Welfareville Compound as this lot parcel is owned by the National Government (Department of Social Welfare and Development). There is, however, a pending Bill (HB No.1716) in the House of Representatives authored by Congressman Neptali M. Gonzales II that seeks to declare Welfareville Property (except the areas occupied by the National Center for Mental Health and the Correctional Institute for Women) disposable and alienable, to be sold through direct negotiated sale to bonafide residents without public bidding.

Another problem is doubled-up households deemed present in high density residential structures. Doubled-up Households are two or more households (usually nuclear family and its extended family) living in the same housing unit. As in the case of Welfareville Compound, it can be observed that doubled-up households can increase exponentially once members of extended families reach legal age and have their own families. But as the housing space remains the same, vertical densification manifests to accommodate new extensions of the extended family. These situations translate to housing backlogs or the lack of housing structures on a one family to one housing unit ratio. Shown in Table 2.18 is the latest report on informal settlers in Mandaluyong City.

Support to Housing

The city has a two-pronged program on housing: theHome for the Homeless program and the Land for the Landless program. (See Map 2.07) The Home for the Homeless Program involves construction of row-houses and housing units in Medium-rise buildings.

Since early part of 1980s, the city government has been constructing row houses and medium-rise residential buildings with units sold to qualified beneficiaries at very low monthly amortizations ranging from P 998.00 to P 3,000.00 depending on which floor level the unit is located, payable in 25 years. Ten (10) medium-rise housing projects have benefitted a total of 1,045 families. The Gawad Kalinga Foundation is a major contributor in the success of this program. Gawad Kalinga Housing Projects are row houses constructed through combined paid labor and sweat equity from the beneficiaries. This is to build up a sense of ownership and good relationship among the GK beneficiaries since together they worked hard for the construction of the housing units and will take great efforts to maintain the units they worked hard for. At present, 729 families have already benefited from this program.

Table 2.17.    2018 Mid-Year Report on Housing

PROGRAM/PROJECT

No. of Beneficiaries

Location of Relocation Site

Relocation Status

 Relocation of ISFs from Danger Zones: along Maytunas Creek, Brgy. Addition Hills and Brgy. Daang Bakal

9       Families 

38   Individuals

Camarin, Caloocan

Relocated: 

April 12, 2018

21   Families

95   Individuals

Camarin, Caloocan

Relocated:

February 8, 2018

13   Families

50   Individuals

Norzagaray Heights, 

Brgy. Bitungol, 

Norzagaray, Bulacan

Relocated: 

May 30, 2017

7 Families

30 Individuals

Norzagaray Heights, 

Brgy. Bitungol, 

Norzagaray, Bulacan

Relocated:

April 20, 2017 

12 Families

44 Individuals

Pandi Residence 1,

Brgy. Mapulang Lupa,

Pandi, Bulacan

Relocated: 

August 23, 2016

8 Families

34 Individuals

Pandi Residence 3,

Brgy. Mapulang Lupa

Pandi, Bulacan

Relocated: 

May 31, 2016

3 Families

12 Indivuduals

Sunshineville 2, Phase 5

Brgy. Cabuco,

Trece Martires City, Cavite

Relocated:

May 31, 2016

16 Families

53 Individuals

Pandi Residence 3,

Brgy. Mapulang Lupa

Pandi, Bulacan

Relocated:

March 23, 2016

In-city Relocation

14   Families

82   Individuals

Fabella MRB,

Brgy. Addition Hills

Relocated: 

December 8, 2017

47   Families

272 Individuals

Fabella MRB,

Brgy. Addition Hills

Relocated:

October 12, 2017

Source: Mandaluyong Housing Development Department

Table 2.18.  Magnitude of Informal Settlers in Mandaluyong City      

BARANGAY

LOCATION

# OF FAMILIES

OWNER

LAND AREA

Addition Hills

  1. Welfareville
  2. Erlinda Fabella
  3. Maytunas Creek

22,000

136

30

LGU/DSWD

LGU

LGU

116H

2,909 sq.mts

Bagong Silang

Maytunas Creek

6

 

 

Barangka Drive

  1. Kapalaran St. (Road Lot)
  2. Halcon Extension (Road Lot)

60

32

LGU

LGU

 

Barangka Ilaya

  1. Palali St. (Road Lot)
  2. Lions Road (Park Lot #3)
  3. Mayon Creek

35

100

61

LGU

LGU

 

Barangka Itaas

Lot 4,5,&6 (Open Space)

50

LGU

736

Barangka Ibaba

  1. Agudo St. (Road Lot)
  2. Irid St. (Road Lot)
  3. PNR Rail Road
  4. Sacrepante St. (Estanislao Prop.)

50

36

80

18

LGU

LGU

LGU

LGU

1,300

Daang Bakal

  1. Haig (Creek) San Juan River Maytunas
  2. Kalenton   g (San Juan River)

22

12

LGU

LGU

Scheduled for Relocation

Highway Hills

  1. 548 Calbayog Pasillio I (Ciriaco Reyes Cmpd)
  2. Calbayog Pasillio Zero (Ciriaco Reyes Cmpd)
  3. Calbayog Pasillio III (MaxGroth)
  4. Calbayog Pasilio IV (Black Village)

25

42

40

80

Private

Private

Private

Private

461

CMP

Mabini J-Rizal

Buhangin Creek

46

LGU

 

Malamig

  1. Arayat St.
  2. 754
  3. Talumpong

82

26

45

Private

Private

Private

 

Mauway

Dr. Fernandez Ext.

Maytunas Creek

30

775

Gov’t.

 

Pleasant Hills

  1. R. Pascual St. (Road Lot)
  2. Triangle (Ildefonso Ong) for final awarding
  3. Madrigal Property (Pagong)

100

34

212

LGU

LGU

Private

 

2,000-Awarded

On-going Exprop.

 Plainview

  1. Kayumanggi St. HOA Inc.
  2. 8 Katarungan St., HOA Inc.
  3. Sto. Rosario
  4. Florante St. (Dulo)
  5. San Miguel St. Bañez Prop. Lower 
  6.  
  7. Malaya St. Benedicto Property

 16

8

38

40

44

 

60

Private

Private

GSIS-Gov’t.

Private

Private

 

Private

244

 

 

535

On-going construction

On-going Negotiation

Pag-asa

Buhangin Creek

2

 

 

Poblacion

  1. Buhangin Creek
  2. Rev. Aglipay HOA Inc.

65

48

Private

2,172

Hagdan Bato Itaas

  1. P. Gomez (Liwanag Prop.)
  2. I. Lopez Ext. (Road Lot)
  3. Gonzaga St.-Bonifacio (Road Lot)

30

35

27

Private

LGU

LGU

1,452

Hagdan Bato Libis

Maytunas Creek

98

 

 

San Jose

Buffer Lot, Ortigas

100

LGU

4,647

Vergara

Entrance Linear Park, J.P. Rizal St.

20

Private

 

 

TOTAL

24,619

 

 

               Source:  Mandaluyong Housing Development Department


The Land for the Landless Program involves on-site development and promotion of Community Mortgage Program to instill among the target families the values of neighborhood cooperation and self-reliance by giving them the responsibility of paying at reasonable terms the housing units and home lots that will eventually be awarded to them. A total of 163.25 Hectares of land comprising of 27 government lands in 15 barangays and the entire length of the Philippine National Railways (PNR) property traversing the city through 11 barangays have been awarded to 4,071 families living in these properties.  The city government negotiates with the affected property owners for the acquisition of their properties under the CMP. A total of 26 landed estates measuring 68,859 sq. meters have been distributed to 1,460 beneficiaries who, through the CMP, pays individually to the city government on a monthly amortization basis. 

The city also has relocation programs for families living   in   danger   zones (Table 2.17) and   those affected by special projects such as development of linear parks along Pasig River.  The city maintains coordination with the National Housing Authority and the Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission in this regard.

PEACE AND ORDER

Barangay Level

A barangay is the basic political unit which serves as the primary planning and implementing unit of government policies, plans, programs, projects, and activities in the community, and as a forum wherein the collective views of the people may be expressed, crystalized and considered.[1]  In the exercise of barangay autonomy, the Barangay Tanods are tasked to exercise police powers in their own respective barangay while a Lupong Tagapamayapa is organized to resolve and take appropriate actions or settle amicably the interpersonal disputes, domestic violence, and emergencies referred to it.  All 27 barangays of Mandaluyong City have 550 organized and trained barangay tanods with the aid of organized civilian volunteers, and 291 Lupong Tagapamayapa members who exercise administrative supervision over the conciliation panels as constituted in accordance with Section 399 of the 1991 LGC (RA7160).  In 2017, There are a total of 3194 settled disputes in all barangay with 48.84% of settled cases with 14.82 million pesos of estimated savings for the government (where a case is estimated to have 9,500 pesos of government savings).

Police Protection

At the city level, peace and order situation is maintained by the Philippine National Police with main headquarters housed in a four-storey building within the city hall compound together with the Bureau of Fire Protection and the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology.  This is augmented   by five police precincts (Map 2.08) scattered in strategic locations within the city (Table 2.19).  As of January 2018, these stations are manned by a total of 669 personnel (PCO, PNCO, NUP) giving off a police-population ratio of 1:633 based on the nighttime population of 423,571 (2018 projection) which is lower compared with the 2015 police-population ratio of 1:1106 based on 2015 MCEP population projection of 357,078. Such ratio is still very high as compared with the ideal ratio of 1 : 300 for highly urbanized cities such as Mandaluyong City.  The ratio is even higher at 1 : 2,532 when considering daytime population which is estimated to be not lower than four times the nighttime population. 

For 2017, Crime Solution Efficiency Rate is recorded at a monthly average of 51% with reported   annual incidences of index crime and non-index crimes at 789 and 489, respectively (Table 2.20).  Index Crimes are those in the line of murder, homicide, rape, physical injury, robbery or theft, and carnapping.  Non-index Crimes are illegal gambling, illegal possession of firearms, and illegal drugs and other violations of special laws. 

[1] 1991 Local Government Code, Book III Section 384

Table 2.19 Number of PNP Personnel (Organic): as of January 2018 (Source: PNP-Mandaluyong)

 

 

Central Station

235

Community Precinct

434

Total

669

Crime-prone areas identified by the PNP are the following:

  • Along EDSA northbound and southbound traversing Barangays Barangka Ilaya, Malamig, Highway Hills, Wack-Wack.
  • Along Shaw Blvd traversing Barangays Addition Hills and Hagdan Bato Libis.
  • Along commercial business districts in the city such as Ortigas, Boni Ave., along Shaw 500, intersection of Shaw Blvd. and EDSA (also known as “Crossing”), etc.

Common crimes reported in these areas are robbery or theft, or what is called “budol-budol”, “tutok” or “salisi”.  In inner roads with minimal illumination or where streetlights are defective, such crimes happen occasionally. The number of cases reported was reduced significantly with the installation of CCTV cameras in strategic locations that helped authorities monitor the areas round the clock.  Bantay-bayans doing rounds frequently and establishment of Bantay-bayan outposts, along with installation of more streetlights also helped discourage commission of such crimes.  The trial implementation of the Anti-Riding-in-tandem Ordinance was notably lauded for its success in warding off potential criminals in the city. 

In addition to these safety measures, the PNP, together with concerned local government departments also implement the Peace and Order and Public Safety Plan for the years 2017-2019. The plan tackles every challenge with a strategy and counter measures with corresponding success indicators to monitor implementation and best practices.

Fire Safety and Protection Services

  The city is protected from fire and conflagration by a central fire station and four fire substations manned as of April 2018 by a total of 115 personnel, male (111) and female (36) combined, giving off a ratio of 1 fireman for every 2,249 individuals (Table 2.21).

Table 2.21.  Roster of BFP Personnel and Volunteers As of April 2018

F/S No.

Name of Fire Station/Fire Sub-station

Total

1

CENTRAL FIRE STATION

Mandaluyong City Hall Compound

15

2

MAUWAY FIRE SUBSTATION

9 de Febrero St., Bgy. Mauway

13

3

EDSA FIRE SUBSTATION

Mayflower St., Bgy. Highway Hills

11

4

HULO FIRE SUBSTATION

Coronado St., Bgy. Hulo

10

5

KALENTONG FIRE SUBSTATION

Gen. Kalentong St., Bgy. Pag-asa

10

6

EMS

9

 

TOTAL

68

The whole force is assisted by civilian employees from the city government functioning as fire aides and the rest doing clerical and utility assignments, and 265 barangay fire volunteers from different barangays of the city with an average of 10 volunteers every barangay. The City also has 11 firetrucks at its disposal whenever emergencies arise.   With   the shortage in manpower and other resources, the City Fire Department has intensified its fire prevention campaign through the following:

  • Continuous conduct of fire safety inspections in different establishments in the city including schools, residential and office buildings, and other places of assembly;
  • Enhancing community relations through fire drills and training of volunteers. By year 2012, 15 out of 27 barangays have organized volunteer fire brigades.
  • Periodic fire drills and conduct of firefighting competitions, inter-high school and inter-barangay. The aim is to increase awareness of high school students and the community in fire prevention and develop fire-fighting tactics and skills.
    • Conduct of IEC for “Oplan Iwas Paputok” especially during the Christmas Holidays by disseminating flyers and pamphlets to the community and utilizing a fire truck and EMS as public address units sounding off warning and tips to prevent fire due to improper use and handling of fire crackers.
    • Implementation of OPLAN BANTAY SUNOG through which residents are provided with empty drums for water storage for fire emergencies.
    • Regular Participation to the “Maging Alerto Mandaleño” during which fire prevention tips and suppression techniques are shared to the community

The Mandaluyong City Fire Station is housed at the 3rd Flr. PNP-BFP-BJMP Complex. The Central Fire Sub-station is located at the ground floor and second floor of the same building. Four other sub-stations, are located in Brgy. Highway Hills, Brgy. Pag-asa, Brgy. Hulo and Brgy. Mauway (Map 2.09)

In 2018, the city experienced a total of 11 major fire incidences which resulted to an estimated P 3,272,000.00 worth of damages to properties (Table 2.22). A third of the major fire occurrences reached up to 3rd degree alarm Residential Fires. A total of 3 civilians and a firefighter were injured in three different instances.

Disaster Preparedness and Risk Management

The city is fortunate to be located on a solid rock foundation that the risks from earthquakes and liquefaction are very minimal.  Severe flooding rarely occurs with the improved drainage systems that flush out rain water to the collecting Pasig and San Juan Rivers. The   most   common    disaster occurring in the city is conflagration. Of the 27 barangays in Mandaluyong, 16 are considered fire prone, these being high density residential areas (Map 2.10) wherein informal communities and socialized housing projects are located.

On November 21, 2013, City Ordinance No. 524, s-2013 was approved creating the Mandaluyong City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office pursuant to RA No. 10121, who shall be responsible for setting the direction, development, implementation and coordination of all DRRM programs in the city.  The DRRMO also has the mandate to organize, train and directly supervise all city/local emergency response teams and Accredited Disaster Volunteers.

Specific areas in the city most likely to be affected by particular types of hazards are shown in Table 2.23.  An inventory of public and private school facilities, gymnasiums and covered courts, barangay halls and other facilities as evacuation centers per type of disaster/calamity is presented in Table 2.24.  (See also Map 2.11)

Table 2.23.  Type of Hazard by Specific Areas

Type

 of Hazard

Barangay/Areas 

Most Likely to be Affected

1.  Earthquake

All 27 barangays

2.  Flooding

Old Zaniga, New Zaniga, Pag-asa, Hulo, San Jose, Bagong Silang, Addition Hills, Vergara, Daang Bakal, Hagdan Bato Libis, Harapin ang Bukas, Mabini – J. Rizal, Plainview, Poblacion, Namayan

3.  Fire

All 27 Barangays

4.  Explosion

All 27 Barangays

5.  Strong Wind/ Tornado

Barangka Ilaya

6.  Chemical Spill

Highway Hills, Wack-Wack, Buayang Bato, Barangka Ilaya, Malamig

Source: CDRRMO (2014 City Profile 101), BFP 2016

SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES

The City Social Welfare and Development Department which provides comprehensive social services, and is staffed with 63 technical personnel and implementers including 9 registered Social Workers, augmented by 50 Volunteer Workers for the Supervised Neighborhood Play Program.

A total of 60-day care centers accredited by the CSWD located in 26 barangays in the city are established to serve the constituents through the Day Care Service Program.

The CSWD also manages three (3) institutions for children, namely:

  • The Bahay Pag-asa Youth Development Center for Boys – Children in Conflict with the Law (CICL) and Children at Risk (CAR) where in 2017 a total of 108 CICL and CAR have availed of temporary and protective custody and access to different resources;
  • The Bahay Tuluyan for Girls which caters to girls and women in extremely difficult circumstances as well as abandoned/ orphaned little boys.
  • The Integrated Day Care Center for children and the Elderly which serves children in the 0-3 yrs. old bracket and senior citizens

The CSWD maintains partnership relations with various government and non-government organizations including those associated with the religious sector, serving the needs of street children and the needy youth, as well as outreach activities and ministries to the needy parishioners.

Four (4) government agencies that have nationwide coverage serve women detainees/prisoners and the mentally ill and recovered psychotics.  These agencies are located within the Welfareville Compound, a 110.40 hectare property of the Department of Social Welfare and Development strategically located at the center of the city.  Locations of these service organizations are shown in Map 2.12

Table 2.25 shows a 4-year comparative report on prevalence of vulnerability of identified vulnerable groups/sectors being served by the CWSD.

Local Council for the Protection of Children

The City Government of Mandaluyong recognizes fully its responsibility to uphold the rights of children for survival, protection, participation and development. On August 4, 2008, the Sangguniang Panlungsod adopted Ordinance No. 405, S–2008 entitled: An Ordinance Creating A “Mandaluyong City Children’s Code” which provides for the formulation and implementation of a Development Plan for Children with corresponding Investment Plan and other support mechanisms for child care and development from infancy to adolescence stage. The Ordinance also creates the Local Council for the Protection of Children which was reorganized by way of Executive Order No.003, s-2010 issued by the Hon. Mayor Benjamin C. Abalos, Jr. on August 2, 2010 strengthening the organization and expanding its membership.

The LCPC is backstopped by a Technical Secretariat composed of lead staff of member- offices of the LCPC.  The LCPC provides technical support to the different Barangay Council for the Protection of Children and the implementation of its programs in the respective barangays.

On August 13, 2018, Ordinance No. 706, Series of 2018, or the “Ordinance creating the Children’s Welfare Code of Mandaluyong City was adopted, thereby amending Ordinance No. 405, Series of 2008, otherwise known as ‘An Ordinance creating the Mandaluyong City Children’s Code and appropriating funds thereof.’”

Mandaluyong City has become popular with its child-friendly initiatives and accomplishments that 2011 and succeeding years were busy years for receiving several visitors from both the local and international communities.